Spiral was the main symbol in the world for thousands of years. We can find thousands of ancient spirals in every part of the world, on every continent. This symbol was used by practically all civilizations and symbolized expansion and focused cosmic energy concentrated in the sun and sky (heaven). The spiral form is the mirroring reflection of the macro-cosmos – the self-expanding Universe.

Spiral is the energetical source, and it is also the initial matter. The first neolithic spirals were found 5000 years ago in Ireland. They are 500 years older than Egyptian pyramids. They are maybe even more mysterious for modern observers than pyramids.

We understand the spiral like a turning moment of the Universe

We understand the spiral like a turning moment of the Universe.

Spiral relates to that time of human history when people lived in harmony with nature, earth cycles, and spirals of nature. That time when people identified themselves much less with their minds. We understand the spiral like a turning moment of the Universe. As a Prahna, or creation power turning the Akasha in the continuum of rigid forms.

The spiral form of the Milky Way galaxy

The spiral form of the Milky Way galaxy.

We can find spirals in all levels of micro and macro-cosmos. From spiral in galactic to underwater systems and weather systems. From spirals of flowing water in your bath to the organization of your DNA. And, to spirals of feelings of your personal energy.

The initial spiral – it is not an “Idea”, but the most probable something, that enables to exist to all possible “variables” and “ideas”. We can find different types of spirals in a variety of natural forms. For example, those clear spirals can be seen on snails, spider nets, beehives, or in the underwater life on corals and billions of skeletons of mussels.

Mussel skeleton in form of a logarithmic, expanding spiral

Mussel skeleton in form of a logarithmic, expanding spiral.

Many of the spirals in nature look logarithmic, or better say, expanding spirals. Their sections are exponentially growing from the center of the spiral. A self-similar logarithmic spiral, the same as the network of Indra, is a hologram and can be characterized that every part of it is a reflection of the whole, of the “single”.

   
Simple visualization of logarithmic expanding spiral

Simple visualization of logarithmic expanding spiral.

-20-

Continue

Skip to content